Contraceptive options

The chart below will help you to compare birth control methods so you can see what’s right for you. Using the chart is easy. Just click on the method of birth control you want to compare and the selected button will turn pink. To remove one from the chart, simply click the button again so it turns white.

Combination Pill
Patch
Diaphragm
Shot (injection)
Male condom
Intrauterine Device (IUD)
Ring
Female condom
Spermicides/Jellies
  • Quick Facts
  • Effectiveness
  • Dosing
  • Doctor's
    Prescription
  • Other Info

Combination pill5

Pill that contains 2 hormones—estrogen and progestin. The hormones in the Pill work by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs. The Pill also thickens the cervical mucus so sperm cannot easily pass through it.
Most combination pills are 99% effective when used as directed
One pill every day (whether or not you have sex)
Yes
  • Shorter, lighter periods
  • Easy to use
  • Allows you to be spontaneous; nothing to do right before sex
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Patch5

Thin plastic patch that sticks to the skin to release 2 hormones—estrogen and progestin. The hormones released by the patch work by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs. The patch also thickens the cervical mucus so sperm cannot easily pass through it. It can be placed on the stomach, buttocks, or upper body.
99% effective when used as directed
Weekly. You place a new patch on the skin once per week for 3 weeks in a row, followed by a patch-free week
Yes
  • Easy to use
  • Can be applied at home
  • Allows you to be spontaneous; nothing to do right before sex
  • May be less effective for women who weigh more than 198 pounds
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Diaphragm5

Shallow, dome-shaped, latex cup with a flexible rim. It is placed inside the vagina to cover the cervix. The diaphragm blocks the opening to the uterus so that sperm cannot reach an egg. Must be fitted by a healthcare provider for correct sizing.
  • 94% effective (when used correctly and every time you have sex)
  • 84% effective (when used incorrectly or inconsistently)
Used only when you have sex
Yes
  • Limited interruption to sex; can be inserted in the vagina a few hours or right before sex
  • To be as effective as possible, must be used with spermicide cream or jelly
  • Must be left inside the vagina for at least 6 hours after sex
  • Can be difficult to insert and/or position correctly
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Shot (injection)5

Shot that releases the hormone progestin into the body. Progestin works by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs. The progestin in the shot also thickens the cervical mucus so sperm cannot easily pass through it.
More than 99% effective when used as directed
One shot every 3 months (12 weeks) injected by a healthcare provider
Yes
  • Effective, long-lasting pregnancy protection
  • Allows you to be spontaneous; nothing to do right before sex
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Male condom5

Thin latex or plastic covering worn on an erect penis during sex. A condom collects the sperm when a man ejaculates to keep it from entering the vagina and joining an egg.
  • 98% effective (when used correctly and every time you have sex)
  • 85% effective (when used incorrectly or inconsistently)
Used only when you have sex
No
  • Inexpensive
  • Moderate protection against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases
  • Easy to use
  • Some interruption to sex; must be put on an erect penis right before sex

IUD5

Small, T-shaped device inserted in the uterus by a healthcare provider. IUDs come in 2 types. Both types affect the way sperm move to keep them from joining an egg, and both change the lining of the uterus. One type of IUD contains copper and the other contains the hormone progestin. This hormone works by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs. It also thickens the cervical mucus so sperm cannot easily pass through it.
More than 99% effective
Depending on the type, can stay in place for up to 10 years after it’s inserted by a healthcare provider
Yes
  • Easy to use
  • Long lasting
  • Allows you to be spontaneous; nothing to do right before sex
  • Possibly lighter periods with reduced cramps (IUD containing progestin)
  • Possibly heavier periods with increased cramps (copper IUD)
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Ring5

Small flexible ring that’s inserted into the vagina to release 2 hormones—estrogen and progestin. The hormones released by the ring work by keeping the ovaries from releasing eggs. The ring also thickens the cervical mucus so sperm cannot easily pass through it.
99% effective when used as directed
Monthly. You insert a ring into your vagina and keep it in place for 3 weeks then remove it for 1 week—3 weeks in, 1 week out
Yes
  • Shorter, lighter periods
  • Easy to use
  • Can be inserted and removed at home
  • Allows you to be spontaneous; nothing to do right before sex
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

Female condom5

Plastic pouch inserted into the vagina. Flexible rings at each end help it to stay in place in the vagina during sex. Like a male condom, it collects the sperm when a man ejaculates to keep it from entering the vagina and joining an egg.
  • 95% effective (when used correctly and every time you have sex)
  • 79% effective (when used incorrectly or inconsistently)
Used only when you have sex
No
  • Inexpensive
  • Some protection against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases
  • Can be difficult to insert in the vagina
  • Some interruption to sex; must be inserted in the vagina right before sex
  • Not as effective as male condoms

Spermicides/jellies5

Available in cream, film, foam, gel, or suppository form and inserted deep into the vagina. Spermicides contain a chemical that stops sperm from moving to keep them from joining an egg. Spermicides also block the opening to the uterus so that sperm cannot reach an egg.
  • 82% effective (when used correctly and every time you have sex)
  • 71% effective (when used incorrectly or inconsistently)
Used only when you have sex (about 10 minutes before sex)
No
  • Convenient
  • Inexpensive
  • Some types may irritate the penis or vagina
  • Can be messy
  • Some interruption to sex; must be inserted in the vagina right before sex
  • Doesn’t protect against HIV infection and other sexually transmitted diseases

+-References

  1. 1. Generess® Fe prescribing information. Parsippany, NJ: Watson Pharma, Inc. March 2012.
  2. 2. Data on file. Actavis Pharma, Inc.
  3. 3. Birth control patient education booklet. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/publications/patient_ education/ab020.cfm. Accessed January 28, 2011.
  4. 4. Menstruation patient education booklet. The American Congress of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. http://www.acog.org/publications/patient_ education/bp049.cfm. Accessed April 6, 2011.
  5. 5. Hatcher RA, Trussell J, Stewart F, et al. Contraceptive Technology. 18th ed. New York, NY: Ardent Media; 2004.
  6. 6. Birth control pills. Planned Parenthood Web site. http://www.plannedparenthood.org/health-topics/birth-control/birth-control-pill-4228.htm. Accessed January 18, 2013.

INDICATION AND USAGE for Generess® Fe

Generess Fe is a prescription birth control pill used for the prevention of pregnancy.

IMPORTANT SAFETY INFORMATION about Generess Fe, including Boxed Warning

WARNING TO WOMEN WHO SMOKE

Do not use Generess Fe if you smoke cigarettes and are over 35 years old. Smoking increases your risk of serious cardiovascular side effects (heart and blood vessel problems) from birth control pills, including death from heart attack, blood clots, or stroke. This risk increases with age and the number of cigarettes you smoke.

Do not use Generess Fe if you have kidney, liver, or adrenal disease because this could cause serious heart and health problems, or if you have or have had blood clots, history of heart attack or stroke, high blood pressure that medicine cannot control, breast cancer or any cancer that is sensitive to female hormones, liver disease or liver tumors, unexplained bleeding from the vagina, or if you are or may be pregnant.

Treatment with Generess Fe should be stopped if you have a blood clot, and at least 4 weeks before and through 2 weeks after major surgery. You should not take Generess Fe any earlier than 4 weeks after having a baby or if you are breastfeeding. If you experience yellowing of the skin or eyes due to problems with your liver, you should stop taking Generess Fe. If you are pre-diabetic or diabetic, your doctor should monitor you while using Generess Fe and should evaluate you if you have any significant change in headaches or irregular menstrual bleeding.

Generess Fe increases the risk of serious conditions including blood clots, stroke, and heart attack. These can be life-threatening or lead to permanent disability.

The most common side effects reported by women taking Generess Fe were nausea/vomiting, headaches/migraine, depression/mood complaints, pain with menstrual bleeding, acne, increased weight, breast pain/tenderness, and anxiety.

Birth control pills do not protect you against any sexually transmitted disease, including HIV, the virus that causes AIDS.

Please see the FDA-Approved Patient Information Leaflet for Generess Fe, including Boxed Warning.

To report a side effect from one of our products, please call the Actavis Drug Safety Department at 1-800-272-5525.

You are encouraged to report negative side effects of prescription drugs to the FDA. Visit www.fda.gov/medwatch, or call 1-800-FDA-1088.